Background Check Online Information Record Search Gateway

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kent

Why Conduct a Background Check?

Employers check potential and current workers for several reasons. The things an employer wants to know about you can vary with the kinds of jobs you might seek. Here are a few of the reasons for employment screening.

Negligent hiring lawsuits are on the rise. If an employee's actions hurt someone, the employer may be liable. The threat of liability gives employers reason to be cautious in checking an applicant's past. A bad decision can wreck havoc on a company's budget and reputation as well as ruin the career of the hiring official. Employers no longer feel secure in relying on their instinct as a basis to hire.

Current events have caused an increase in employment screening.

Child abuse and child abductions in the news in recent years have resulted in new laws in almost every state that require criminal background checks for anyone who works with children. The move to protect children through criminal background checks now includes volunteers who serve as coaches for youth sports activities and scout troop leaders.

Terrorist acts of September 11, 2001, have resulted in heightened security and identity-verification strategies by employers. Potential job candidates and long-time employees alike are being examined with a new eye following September 11, 2001.

Corporate executives, officers, and directors now face a degree of scrutiny in both professional and private life unknown before the Enron debacle and other corporate scandals of 2002.

False or inflated information supplied by job applicants is frequently in the news. Some estimates are that 30% to 40% of all job applications and resumes include some false or inflated facts. Such reports make employers wary of accepting anyone's word at face value.

Federal and state laws require that background checks be conducted for certain jobs. For example, most states require criminal background checks for anyone who works with children, the elderly, or disabled. The federal National Child Protection Act authorizes state officials to access the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database for some positions. Many state and federal government jobs require a background check, and depending on the kind of job, may require an extensive investigation for a security clearance.

The "information age" itself may be a reason for the increase in employment screening -- the availability of computer databases containing millions of records of personal data. As the cost of searching these sources drops, employers are finding it more feasible to conduct background checks.


for more info visit: http://www.backgroundcheckrecordsearch.com
 
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biobo

Advice for you guys.When you are making hiring decisions, Conduct background checks. If an employee breaks the law while performing his or her duties for your company, you may be held liable. Conducting a background check can help determine if an applicant has a criminal history, and can help insulate you against possible lawsuits.You might need a bit more information than your applicants provide. After all, some folks give false or incomplete information in employment applications. And workers probably don't want you to know certain facts about their past that might disqualify them from getting a job. Generally, it's good policy to do a little checking before you make a job offer.

A criminal check is a part of the background check done for pre-employment screening. A criminal background checkbackground check has become an inexpensive way of legally obtaining details about a person. The details of the person can even be provided to the companies through their websites online and the results would be produced as soon as possible depending on the extent of the background check required.

A criminal check can be done by investigating the criminal history of the person that would be recorded in the criminal record manuals of the courts. Each state would contain the details of all the individuals having a criminal background in their respective courts. A nationwide search might prove to be tougher since there is no general national database being maintained and open to the public that might provide the list of all the criminals in the country.

Since state records are only able to provide the criminal history of a person in that state, it might be difficult to rule out the option of that individual having committed some crime in some other state. The only option would be to believe that a criminal would not move too far away from their home to commit a crime.
 
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