Cigarettes to be banned from display in shops and supermarkets

Shoud Cigarettes Be Hidden From View Now?

  • Yes, start it now

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • No, in 12 months time

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, in a couple of years like the government plans

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • They shouldn`t be hidden from view

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Cigarettes should be banned altogether

    Votes: 1 50.0%

  • Total voters
    2
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TeamPlayer

Yellow Belt
Cigarettes are to be banned from open display in shops and supermarkets in a fresh attempt to cut the number of smokers, the government will announce today.

Alan Johnson, the Health Secretary, will announce that the prohibition will be implemented in supermarkets in 2011 and small shops in 2013. It is understood that ministers decided on not implementing the ban instantly because of a desire to ease the impact of the move on small business during the recession.

The Health Secretary will also announce, however, that a move to ban cigarette vending machines in pubs has been dropped in favour of a plan for the machines to operate only by the use of tokens.

People would have to show they are 18 in order to be given the tokens. The machines will also have stronger warnings on them telling young people of the dangers of smoking.

Today's moves follow a behind-the-scenes initiative within the Government to delay the department's plans led by Lord Mandelson, Business Secretary, and supported by MPs of all parties and the Prime Minister.

They had argued that enforcing the ban immediately - as was initially intended - would harm the profitability of small businesses during the slump. There had been threats of a Commons rebellion if the plans went ahead with immediate effect.

The first indication of the fact that the measures would not be implemented immediately came when the package was excluded from last week' Queen's Speech, in which the government sets out its legislative programme for the next parliamentary year.

However, Mr Brown appeared to make clear that he would not drop the plans all together when he told MPs last month that it was "not good enough" that smoking rates among children had only been cut from 13% to six per cent, and more needed to be done. Official statistics show that almost 200,000 children aged between 11-15 were still regular smokers in 2007.

The Government has already raised the age limit for buying tobacco from 16 to 18, as well as passing legislation banning smoking in public places, which was supported by a cross-section of MPs from all parties.

Timesonline
 

odls

Yellow Belt
It is understood that ministers decided on not implementing the ban instantly because of a desire to ease the impact of the move on small business during the recession.
Call me a cynic but might it just have something to do with the Treasury having longer to reel in tobacco duties and VAT from the sales of cigs, more than for any other reason?

If it's right to do it in a few years time, why isn't it right to start it right now? If the UK goes through a recession again in the future, will the rules be relaxed to allow shopkeepers to openly sell them on shelves again to 'help them through the recession?'
 

TeamPlayer

Yellow Belt
A controversial but overdue anti-smoking measure seeking to require tobacco products to bear pictorial health warnings is expected to be approved by the Senate despite a change in health committee chairmanships.

The passage of the graphic health warning bill is already considered overdue in the Philippines. The country is a signatory to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which seeks the adoption by September this year of effective health warnings on tobacco products.

Senate bill 2377, entitled "An Act to Effectively Instill Health Consciousness Through Picture-Based Warning on Tobacco Products," was on second reading when a leadership change was pulled off by a group of senators. A bill on second reading means legislators are deliberating on it and amendments are being introduced.

abs-cbnnews
 
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